New surgery for groin pain gets footballers back on the pitch

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(image above) Computerised tomography (CT) scan of right hip. The arrow shows the area of ball that is more egg shaped. As the hip moves this rubs unevenly on the socket damaging the cartilage, causing pain.

As the FIFA World Cup approaches, researchers have found that keyhole surgery could help get injured footballers back on the pitch faster than physiotherapy-led treatments.

The team led by the University of Warwick has analysed two treatments for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome which refers to a problem with the hip’s ball and socket joint. 

 In some people the ball is more egg shaped than round which can cause it to rub unevenly against the socket. This causes damage to the delicate cartilage that lines the socket and is especially debilitating for active people; as the damage accumulates, their pain gets worse causing loss of movement. 

 

Probably the commonest cause of groin pain in footballers and is often mistakenly diagnosed as chronic groin strain, it is most common in young adults and people who do sports.

Now a team from the Universities of Warwick, Bristol, and Keele has conducted the world’s first randomised trial to first trial to highlight the benefit of hip arthroscopy, a new treatment for FAI syndrome. Hip arthroscopy, a keyhole surgery procedure, can be used to repair the damage to the hip and to reshape the ball to make it round again.

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Source: http://www.hospital-times.co.uk/new-surgery-for-groin-pain-gets-footballers-back-on-the-pitch/